The Versatility of Sourdough

Discover the versitality of Sourdough! Cakes, donuts, tortillas, waffles, and more!

I’m fairly certain that if someone had told me how many things I could make with sourdough, I’d have tried this thing sooner. So, I’m gonna do you the favor and give you a visual tour through everything we’ve made with sourdough in the last two months…Hold on, this is gonna be a wild (and drool inducing) ride!

{Just so you know ~ Many of the product links on this page are affiliate links meaning a make a percentage of profit if you buy the item via my link we and will be blessed through your purchase, thank you!}

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First, we have our starter, whom we named Bubbles at the suggestion of a reader on our facebook page. (Incidentally, that’s our kefir in the background, Bubble’s counter buddy. Hmm. Kefir needs a name. Ideas, anyone?) You can learn to ‘capture’ your own wild yeast and make all the yummy things I’m about to show you in the book “Sourdough A to Z“. It’s my sourdough bible.

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Of course, I just had to try sourdough bread as soon as my starter was mature.

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The first batch flopped, but was still delicious for french toast.

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Then I tried tortillas. These were so easy, ’cause they’re supposed to flop! lol I seriously like the pliability of the finished tortillas better than my standard recipe. Nice.

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And fantastic with julienned carrots and cucumbers, avocados, sweet and sour chicken, peanut sauce, kimchi, and feta cheese. Just sayin’.

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I admit to the real reason I got into sourdough…I heard you can make chocolate cake with it.

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Super good. Super moist. And that frosting? Made with homemade, raw, lacto-fermented cream cheese and sucanat that I powdered in my blender. Boo-yah! I go to all kinds of crazy trouble to make gourmet food I love that’s also nutrient rich in the long, snowed-in days of winter. We don’t eat like this in the summer, true story.

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Second try with the bread was also kinda brick-like, so we turned it into blueberry (cream cheese!) french toast  with this awesome recipe from my friend, Claire of Lemon Jelly Cake.

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So, we went back to the no-fail simplicity of smaller breads. These were the best waffles I’ve ever had. (Just ignore that I say that every time I make waffles) Seriously perfect marriage of crisp and fluffy.

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Sourdough Biscuits. Oh, my heart. Paired here with Greek Salad and Stuffed Peppers and Shells.

Oh, and we mustn’t forget the pita bread we used for the gyros here.

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Doughnuts. Did you know you can make sourdough doughnuts? And that frying them in coconut oil makes them melt-in-your-mouth amazing, and a source of good fats in your day? Do you love me? I just told you doughnuts were good for you. That chocolate peanut butter glaze? Not so much. 😉 But they were totally good even without the frosting, and we even ate them cold, three days old in the car for a snack and they were still good. I need to make these again…

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Third try with Honey Sourdough Bread. I think we’ve got a rise here, people!

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And, third try’s the charm! (just like my sauerkraut!) At least for the loaf on the left.

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To help me feel better about that second loaf, I made a cake again. This time? Carrot Pineapple with cream cheese frosting. Just had the last of this for breakfast yesterday. Yes, cake for breakfast. Because it’s sourdough, and sourdough is easier to digest and better for you than regular baked goods. Take that, conscience!

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I have normal things for breakfast, too. Like a heap of scrambled eggs and a little cinnamon honey butter on a slice of sourdough toast.

Are you blown away? I am. Got ideas for what else I can do with sourdough? Ready to try it yourself?

17 responses to “The Versatility of Sourdough”

  1. beth Avatar

    Lessons learned as I had to try multiple times to get the sourdough bread that worked: it needs a warm place to rise/proof/rest; it takes TIME. My bulk rise is about 6 hours. Before that is a 2hr flour+water pre-lysing stage; add sourdough starter + salt and pull and stretch every 30 minutes for a couple of hours; the 6 hour rise; 30 minutes on the counter; 2+ hours in the loaf pan if using a loaf pan. All with the surround temp being above 85F. But, oh so good when it works!

  2. Connie Avatar
    Connie

    I make a no-knead sourdough bread. It is delicious and it has never failed me. Here is the link to Bread Topia.
    https://breadtopia.com/sourdough-no-knead-bread/

  3. BRENDA Avatar
    BRENDA

    My Herman starter just turned a year old..it is similar to the Amish friendship bread, I have successfully used it to make various kinds of muffins and loaves, pretzels, cinnamon rolls, Christmas cake, coffee cake, chocolate cake, pineapple cake, biscuits, cookies, naan bread, pizza dough, waffles, pancakes, and crackers.

  4. Cindy Avatar
    Cindy

    You should try cinnamon rolls. I’ve also made blackberry scones, blackberry cobbler, and brownies with sourdough starter. My bread has done well but you have to feed the start a bit before you start so that it’s fermenting and add a little sugar to the amount you’ve pulled out for your recipe. Biggest thing is be patient. Room temperature and humidity affect how lonf to get that rise. Hope that helps some.

    1. Trina Avatar

      Thanks, Cindy! that goes along with what I’m learning as I continue to explore…making a proof for my sandwich bread is helping.

  5. Bethany Avatar

    Wow, these look so yummy! Makes me want to learn more about sourdough! Our family has used Amish friendship bread in the past and loved it…do you know if the taste and uses are similar?

    1. Trina Avatar
      Trina

      Oh, Bethany…I know of the delicious bread of which you speak, and though they are both built off the foundation of wild yeast rather than packaged, and you have to feed them regularly, Amish Friendship bread is soooo sweet and not really good for you, it can hardly be in the same category with the sour, nutritious sour dough. Which is sad. 😉

      1. Bethany Avatar

        Oh that is so so sad!

    2. BRENDA Avatar
      BRENDA

      My Herman starter just turned a year old..it is similar to the Amish friendship bread, I have successfully used it to make various kinds of muffins and loaves, pretzels, cinnamon rolls, Christmas cake, coffee cake, chocolate cake, pineapple cake, biscuits, cookies, naan bread, pizza dough, waffles, pancakes, and crackers.

  6. Becky Avatar
    Becky

    I have been working through Sourdough A-Z for the last few months too! I am loving it and now I crave sourdough over other baked goods 🙂

    1. Trina Avatar
      Trina

      Becky, I don’t if I’m to the craving point, but I agree that it’s a whole lot of fun!

    2. Marion Avatar

      I have e 3 sour dough starters ; I have a red potato starter named paddy , a white potato starter named Sean, and my husband has a standard sour dough which we named dusty. And like flowers they like to be talked too, treat them like a pet or child and the results are amazing.

  7. Lisa Avatar

    LOL – we need to name our starter. 🙂 I also love the “Vintage Remedies Guide to Bread” – lots of great info and recipes in there.

    1. Trina Avatar
      Trina

      I will have to check that out–thanks for the recommendation, Lisa!

  8. Lauren Avatar

    Unbelievable! That cake has me sold! but the bread, hmm, still tricky? Gotta dig into my A-Z Sourdough book…if only we hadn’t decided to cut back on the gluten/breads for the next month…. :0/

    1. Trina Avatar
      Trina

      Lauren, just as a yeast-raised bread is a little trickier than a baking powder-raised muffin, sourdough loaf is a little more challenging than smaller sourdough breads like pancakes and cakes. I’m sure it’s just gonna take a little more practice for me, and it will be worth it!

  9. Claire @ Lemon Jelly Cake Avatar

    I’m so glad my recipe resuscitated the brick-like bread. 🙂 My mind is indeed officially blown by all these different uses for sourdough!

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